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On the Road to the Bottom of the Grand Canyon

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Serving Lunch at the Bottom of The Grand Canyon

Traveling on the Only Road to the Bottom

Up to forty miles wide,
as much as a mile and a quarter deep, The Grand Canyon cuts its way through 278 miles of Northern Arizona.   Except by foot, Navajo Bridge at Marble Canyon, Arizona to the east and Hoover Dam at Boulder City, Nevada to the west, are the closest ways to get from one side to the other.

And the best kept secret in Arizona
is the one and only road to the bottom.

Vans on the Diamond Creek Road to the Bottom of Grand Canyon
Diamond Creek Entering the Colorado River at the Bottom of Grand Canyon.

It wasn't always that way.

Even though this is the place where in 1858 Lt. Joseph Christmas Ives wrote his often quoted journal passage "Ours has been the first and will doubtless be the last party of whites ever to visit this profitless locality".

Twenty four years later
it became the original Grand Canyon tourist destination.

In 1882 the railroad crossed Northern Arizona

bringing with it the first Grand Canyon tourists.   By 1884 the Farlee Hotel was welcoming guests where the road first encounters Diamond Creek, a mile from the Colorado River.

But with increasing competition

from the more populated areas of Flagstaff and Williams and damage from a flood, the Farlee closed in 1889.
First Crossing of Diamond Creek a Mile from the Colorado River in Grand Canyon.
Diamond Peak and the Only Road to the Bottom of The Grand Canyon

The horses and wagons to the South Rim

were eventually replaced by a railroad spur out of Williams.   In its turn the railroad was replaced by highways and automobiles.

Today millions of people visit

The Grand Canyon each year.   The overwhelming majority of them going to the South Rim.   Few of them go into The Canyon.   Fewer still go to the bottom or book a raft trip.   And least of all are those who travel the road.

Off a dusty remnant of Rt. 66

a mile of pavement followed by 20 miles of dirt winds its way down 4000 feet of elevation to the bottom of The Grand Canyon.   As you decend cliffs slowly rise around you.

Standing at the Rivers Edge

above the Diamond Creek Rapids it could strike you that the rest of Lt. Ives famous quote might have a little more truth to it...

Diamond Creek Road to the Colorado River in Grand Canyon.
Wild Burros in The Grand Canyon

"It seems intended by nature

that the Colorado River, along the greater portion of its lonely and majestic way, shall be forever unvisited and undisturbed."

- Lt. Joseph Christmas Ives


[ A Canyon Interlude ]

This is an all inclusive trip with pick up and drop off at many locations across Arizona.

Price includes: Transportation, Entrance Fees/Permits, Lunch and Dinner and a Geologic Travel Guide with 40 years of Grand Canyon experience.

This trip requires a minimum of two people to run.

Trips of two or more days can also be arranged to include additional Grand Canyon locations.

For Current Rates, Reservations or More Information - Call 928-595-2250

Spring Diamond Creek Beach at the Bottom of The Grand Canyon

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